A year after Seattle’s minimum wage ordinance is signed into law, the sky remains aloft

In the year between the first Seattle fast food strikes and the passage of Seattle’s landmark $15 minimum wage law, business lobbyists and self-appointed experts insisted that they knew what happen if we raised the minimum wage. It was Economics 101, they’d say: higher wages would surely sink the economy. Businesses would be destroyed. Franchises would cease to exist. Prices would rise 25% or more. Open for business signs would go dark, owners would move to Texas, and Seattle would become a city of Cheesecake Factories. It hasn't quite turned out that way.

A year later, it’s time to take a look at how those predictions are holding up. Spoiler alert: the sky remains aloft.

Read More

Writers, self-appointed experts, and other Henny Pennys predict disaster, destruction, and the chaining of Seattle… but businesses of all sizes continue to hire and restaurants continue to boom

From Howard Schultz of Starbucks to Tim Worstall of Forbes to the Seattle Times Editorial Board, all kinds of self-appointed experts repeatedly insisted that they had expert insight into the consequences of a $15 wage in Seattle. A year later, their predictions have turned out about as well as anything else from Chicken Little. The sky remains aloft.

Read More

Owner of Dick’s Drive-In says raising prices would “have to be our first response” and benefits would "have to be on the table"... then does not raise prices or cut benefits

The owner of local burger chain Dick’s Drive-In, the granddaughter of the founder, argued that a $15 wage would have serious consequences for workers and customers. Now, Dick’s said it won't raise prices after all, and they continue to provide scholarships & benefits as they have done for some time.

Read More

Subway owners said Seattle $15 law would make businesses "cease to exist" in Seattle and raise prices $1/sub... now opening restaurants, advertising high wages, and only raising prices 4%

Owners of Subway stores have spoken out repeatedly against Seattle’s $15 minimum wage law, making all kinds of predictions about business closures and cost increases. They're even supporting the lawsuit to overturn Seattle's $15 law. But since the first wage increase took effect, Subways are expanding, barely raising prices, and hiring on the basis of their high wages.

Read More

Owner of Coastal Kitchen & Mioposto says it’s “not one of those Chicken Little moments” & he “certainly won’t open another business in our beloved Seattle”… then opens two more businesses in Seattle

Jeremy Hardy is an experienced restauranteur who contributed to the Forward Seattle effort to repeal Seattle’s $15 minimum wage law and argued repeatedly in support of a sub-minimum wage loophole for employees who receive tips. He has opened two new restaurants in Seattle since he began predicting imminent disaster.

Read More